Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Team Update: Uniforms, Pictures, First Meet

Thursday, December 8, 2016 is Uniform Day!

Uniforms will be issued in room B-102 at 3;15. We will remain in B-102 for a team meeting and film review with practice to follow. We will review what you can expect at your first meet of the season and what to expect for various events including an overview of the meet process.

Friday, December 9 is Picture Day.

We will have team pictures taken on Friday 12/9 at 4:15. Friday is also the day before our first varsity meet - that means you may wear your track uniforms to school. Please wear a long-sleeve white shirt under.

Sunday, November 27, 2016

No Practice Saturday December 3, 2016

To to a school function, there will be NO Practice on Saturday, December 3, 2016.
Please consider joining us at the firs-annual BK Vendor Fair.

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Nice job at practice on Saturday

Thank you to all the athletes who made the time to come to practice Saturday. All of the groups did a good job with the workout.

Friday, November 25, 2016

Why are we running outside?

This is a re-post from last year.

Hey Coach, this is supposed to be indoor track...why are we running outside?


Maggie and Caroline during warmups
This is the question I've heard many times during our first four weeks of indoor track. Since many of the student-athletes have been asking about this, its safe to think parents may have the same question.

Let  me explain.

I'm guessing the question comes up because, as the name implies, indoor track is an indoor sport yet we've been outside quite a bit. While this is true, there are many reasons why the coaching staff will take the athletes outside this time of year despite the obvious drawbacks of limited daylight and cold temperatures.

Training for the indoor track season (typically) takes place in the hallways of our school building. Most indoor track teams face the same limitations that come with running hallways as few have dedicated indoor track facilities. The stress on the body that occurs from a daily dose of running on hard-tile floors can cause overuse  injuries and stress on the athlete. The various aches and pains that emerge between the second and third week of practice can be attributed, in part, to the surfaces we're running on. Athlete conditioning and footwear also play a role. The coach has to balance the training needs against environmental limitations to prevent injury as best as possible and still get the team ready to compete.

Sean, Nick leading other runners
The weather conditions so far this season has provided us with a fantastic opportunity to train outside. We've been able to be on the track, the parking lot, sidewalks, and grass. The ability to train outside on these different surfaces will reduce the training stress on the body as well as preventing some the boredom that comes with repetitious activity indoors.

But what about the cold? We've been lucky to have temperatures between 40 and 50 degrees this season but it can feel a bit colder. Some people get worried they will get sick from training outside this time of year. While colds and general illnesses tend to spike around this season, training outside is not likely to be the culprit of illness. Here's why:

You get sick from coming in contact with a virus or bacteria or some other pathogen. You cannot get a cold (or the flu) from being cold. You have to come in contact with the disease that causes the illness. That means contact with objects or other people...indoors or out. This is why washing your hands is so important. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have confirmed that simply washing your hands is the most effective way to prevent the spread of disease. Period. Don't want to get sick? Wash your hands!

If you're sick, tell the coach. This is simple. If you're already sick (its not your fault, it happens no matter how hard we try to stay healthy) you need to tell your coach. If you have a fever, sore throat or congestion in your chest you shouldn't be at practice and certainly shouldn't be training. These symptoms indicate that you're already sick and your immune system needs all the calories, rest, and sugar-free hydration it can get to fight off whatever it is. Sick? Tell a coach. Practice can wait. Your health is most important.

Judah and Ian
In addition to having contact with a disease, you're immune system has to be weakened or susceptible to that disease in order for you to get sick. Now this is where things can get tricky. Vigorous exercise can, in the short term, weaken your immune system. Marathon and half-marathon runners and triathletes can sometimes get sick during or after a strenuous part of their training cycle or after a race. Thats because, even if they've been washing their hands, they've come into contact with a disease and their immune system hasn't recovered from the stress of training or long race. Student-athletes can face a similar situation. Good coaching practices that keep workouts reasonable, yet productive, will help avoid some of the training stress that can wear down your immune system. Thats part of the coaches job. You have a bigger job...

The athlete can do much more than the coach when it comes to keeping fit and healthy. Getting enough sleep, proper nutrition, and sugar-free hydration (along with hand washing) are all controllable by the athlete and will contribute to a stronger immune system and better state of health while training. You'll be able to train hard and remain healthy.

Training in the colder weather has its health advantages, too. You'll notice your nose running when your training in the cold. This is, in part, due to the impact of the cool air on your sinuses - the cool air reduces swelling and promotes drainage. Thats a good thing...looks awful, but it is good. As we rid the accumulated mucous from our sinuses we also flush away many of the germs, bacteria, viruses, that are hanging out in there. Keeping well hydrated with sugar-free drinks helps keep this mucous and secretions thin and able to drain well, preventing congestion and the "stuffy/runny nose" many people seem to get this time of year.

Key points:
Training on a variety of surfaces reduces injury.
You don't catch a cold from being cold - you get sick from contact with a disease. Wash your hands!
Your immune system can take a beating from strenuous training -  you can help by eating, sleeping and drinking healthy!
Training outside in the cold weather can actually help the body and keep you strong while enjoying your fitness!